We have been divided and conquered by Big Food

junk-food-pyramid

Let’s face it: we have been divided and conquered by the food and beverage industry. It’s not pretty. In fact, they have been running circles around us, more or less unopposed on their way to almost gaining 100% control of what we eat and obviously making mega profits along the way. Most people probably never realized there was a match on. Sometime in the future, I am sure we will ask ourselves how we could let them get away with so much, just like we today are asking ourselves how we failed to control Big Tobacco.

http://authoritynutrition.com/big-food-is-much-worse-than-big-tobacco/

Here are some of the things they have been getting away with:

– loading our food with toxins, chemicals, preservatives, pesticides, antibiotics and steroids

– adding sugar, salt and fat to pretty much everything to make it more palatable and cover up any bad tastes

– specifically targeting children in their advertising

– increasingly producing “food” in factories without any natural ingredients or nutrients

– saying they want to be part of the solution, for example by reducing calories, but then doing the complete opposite

All of these changes have been very gradual so that no one would notice. Historically, we have been suckers for these slow changes. As an example of just how toxic our food environment has become, picture yourself time-travelling from the 1950:s, just before the rise of the junk/fast food industry, to today. You would be stunned at the amount of junk food on offer, and the brash and cynical marketing that accompanies it (think toys to children from the latest children’s movie, for example).

Now, thankfully, the tide appears to be turning. More and more people are waking up and not liking what they are being served or how mega food companies operate, and are starting to find more healthy and sustainable food sources or even growing their own. Crucially, consumers are also getting more and more connected and organized in fighting back, particularly in the US. This is where the fighting appears to be at its most fierce, since this is also where the food environment is worst.

We have to be mindful, however, of not falling for more of their classic divide and conquer tactics. One such example is when we as researchers try to link a particular junk food or beverage to a particular health outcome, such as obesity or depression. By just focusing on one adverse health outcome, and endlessly debating this, we are shooting ourselves in the foot and not getting anywhere. What we have to do is to analyze the total cost of junk food, including all known health problems and the negative effects on the environment (which are massive).

I doubt that we can count on politicians to solve this for us, this needs to come from the bottom up, i.e. consumer power. And once enough people get fired up and organized, then we will start to see real change happening, i.e. real food, packed with nutrition and grown in a truly sustainable way, available to everyone.

natural-foods

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How can we possibly prevent obesity when there is so much inequality?

Make no mistake about it: wealth inequality is one of the main drivers of health and disease generally. Inequality is strongly associated with outcomes such as obesity, depression, diabetes, cancer, heart disease, arthritis, etc. The list is very long.

Given that inequality is reaching new heights every day it seems, we have to ask ourselves how we can possibly hope to prevent obesity, and other major diseases, in the face of this massive inequality? Please watch this short and very informative video of how skew the distribution of wealth really is.

http://consciouslifenews.com/viral-video-us-wealth-inequality/#

If you have the time, you can also listen to self-confessed plutocrat Nick Hanauer talk about how the pitchforks will come out soon if this situation is not remedied.

Indeed, the situation in the US, the UK and elsewhere is not unlike the pre-revolution situation in France some 225-230 years ago. The good thing is that a financial crisis like we have today can act as a very powerful catalyst for replacing the current dysfunctional economy, that only works for the wealthy few, with something that allows everyone to thrive.

Because obesity mostly affects the poor, it is not surprising that the epidemic is doing so well, since more and more people are crossing the poverty line and the middle class is being squeezed. How would you react if you were below that poverty line, and you were being told to buy more vegetables and exercise more, when you are working 2-3 jobs just to stay alive and put food on the table, and not knowing if you are going to have any job next month or even next week?

If governments were really serious about preventing disease, they should first do their utmost to reduce wealth inequality. Only then will it be realistic to expect our prevention programs to have any kind of positive effect on the obesity epidemic.

Erik Hemmingsson

Polarity abounds and why it’s time for a new way of doing things

It appears to be a human condition to react very slowly, if at all, to adverse changes that happen very gradually (think the obesity epidemic). If bad things happen very quickly, then we have no problem mobilizing at all, such as what happened during the SARS outbreak just over a decade ago. Moreover, the factors that are feeding the obesity epidemic, such as processed junk food, stress, and socioeconomic adversity, have changed steadily but very gradually as well, making for one gigantic slippery slope that we have apparent problems reacting to.

It seems as if many things in society, including the drivers of the obesity epidemic, are now reaching some kind of peak polarity, i.e. you are either very poor or very rich, you either eat only nutritious organic food or only junk food, and you either exercise 7 times per week according to the latest hype, or you refuse to exercise at all. In terms of socioeconomics the middle class is disappearing fast, and the 1% seemingly flourishes at the expense of the rest of society.

Polarities abound in the present time, and this makes it very difficult to make any inroads into creating the conditions we need in order to produce successful obesity prevention and treatment programs. In short, it is very difficult to separate the fortunes of the individual from the rest of society, and society is not in a happy place right now.

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2011/02/income-inequality-in-america-chart-graph

change-since-1979-600

 

Politically, there is much current upheaval in the world, possibly with some kind of peak fear with war in the middle east, ebola outbreaks, water shortages, extreme weather, and an economy in tailspin – can it get any worse?

The good news is that more and more people are waking up to the fact that the current systems, i.e. politics, finance, food environment, lifestyles, etc, are obviously in need of major reform. Maybe we are even getting close to some kind of breaking point for the current dysfunctional way of doing things. I thick that we are, and when enough people wake up to this reality, that is when we can create the conditions we need for preventing obesity globally.

Do we, for example, want to keep eating junk food when it is abundantly clear that such food is very harmful to our health, do we want to keep the current financial system that only seems to work for the 1%, and do we want politicians that are heavily influenced by corporate interests. Or do we want something better? It’s not as utopian as many people think that it is.

 

Erik Hemmingsson

 

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