How can we possibly prevent obesity when there is so much inequality?

Make no mistake about it: wealth inequality is one of the main drivers of health and disease generally. Inequality is strongly associated with outcomes such as obesity, depression, diabetes, cancer, heart disease, arthritis, etc. The list is very long.

Given that inequality is reaching new heights every day it seems, we have to ask ourselves how we can possibly hope to prevent obesity, and other major diseases, in the face of this massive inequality? Please watch this short and very informative video of how skew the distribution of wealth really is.

http://consciouslifenews.com/viral-video-us-wealth-inequality/#

If you have the time, you can also listen to self-confessed plutocrat Nick Hanauer talk about how the pitchforks will come out soon if this situation is not remedied.

Indeed, the situation in the US, the UK and elsewhere is not unlike the pre-revolution situation in France some 225-230 years ago. The good thing is that a financial crisis like we have today can act as a very powerful catalyst for replacing the current dysfunctional economy, that only works for the wealthy few, with something that allows everyone to thrive.

Because obesity mostly affects the poor, it is not surprising that the epidemic is doing so well, since more and more people are crossing the poverty line and the middle class is being squeezed. How would you react if you were below that poverty line, and you were being told to buy more vegetables and exercise more, when you are working 2-3 jobs just to stay alive and put food on the table, and not knowing if you are going to have any job next month or even next week?

If governments were really serious about preventing disease, they should first do their utmost to reduce wealth inequality. Only then will it be realistic to expect our prevention programs to have any kind of positive effect on the obesity epidemic.

Erik Hemmingsson

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Bullying and obesity go hand in hand in so many ways

If you have any working experience in an obesity treatment facility you would be very familiar with the many gut-wrenching stories of bullying that the patients have experienced. A routine question to ask the patients is if they have any clue as to why they gained the extra weight to begin with. It’s not unusual to hear that it all started with the bullying, usually from a young age.

bullies_kids

You may think that this is mainly peer-to-peer, but it can definitely be from parents as well. Usually this would be related to something they perceive to be not quite right with the child, perhaps carrying a tiny, tiny amount of extra weight. The child will then be told that there is something wrong with them. Obviously this is not the case, it’s the parent who is wrong for instilling the child with an erroneous negative self-belief (there is something wrong with me).

And how many stories have we not heard about  the completely insensitive bullying athletics coach/PE teacher who thinks that the child is overweight and needs to lose weight ASAP, and who always picks these children last for the teams, et cetera, et cetera.

The message for these bullied children is unbelievably negative: you are not good enough, there is something wrong with you, nobody wants to be with you. It’s not exactly strange that the obese in general have lower self-esteem and confidence than normal weight individuals, both as children and as adults.

Then there is the more classic case of bullying among children, sometimes from pre-school, because of a lack of tolerance and respect for what looks slightly out of the norm, particularly give our completely unrealistic body shape ideals. More and more studies are now confirming all those anecdotes about the toxic effects of bullying:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25157018

Indeed, obese children are much more likely to suffer bullying than normal weight children, which is confirmed by both the children themselves and also the teachers. But this does not mean that the bullying only happens during the childhood years. Studies on obesity bias and discrimination are becoming much more common, for example by Rebecca Puhl and colleagues at Yale. Please take the time to watch some if not all of this excellent talk, for example on how stigmatization has a profoundly negative effect on our physical, social, psychological and emotional health and well-being:

If we are serious about preventing obesity, we cannot emphasize enough the importance of zero tolerance towards bullying, in whatever form it comes in, and regardless of where it comes from. We also need to address all those negative self-beliefs and fears that arise as a result of bullying. This include things like body dissatisfaction because we perceived our body as the reason the bullying started in the first place.

antibullyinglogo3

I also firmly believe that anyone who wants to lose weight long-term needs to overcome their more or less inevitable body dissatisfaction, and connect in a more positive way with their bodies, as opposed to rejecting them and seeing them as the source of shame and discomfort. The more you have of negative thoughts and emotions in relation to your body, the more weight you are likely to trap. It’s not exactly a surprise that more and more studies are now confirming that bullying leads to weight gain, which leads to more bulling, which leads to more weight gain, which leads to more bullying…

Erik Hemmingsson

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Lasting weight loss comes from the inside, not the outside

It’s quite remarkable just how much we continue to search for well-being and happiness from outside sources, such as a new job, new relationship, new car, hairstyle, watch, suit, dress, shoes, and the list goes on. If you take a step back and look at our general way of life, it kind of feels like we are conditioned to run around the treadmill of life constantly in need of outside things and gadgets to make us happy. Of course, we rarely get any lasting fulfillment in getting those new shoes, or whatever we long for, yet we keep doing it over and over again.

Einstein

The same can definitely be said of dieting. The pattern of weight loss and regain will be very familiar to all those who struggle with weight problems. A very large part of why dieting fails is that we don’t get to the bottom of why the weight gain occurred to begin with, and, even though there are different ways of looking at this, my view is that the vast majority of weight gain comes from the inside in the form of negative thoughts and emotions. The origins of those negative thoughts and emotions can be very complex but there is no doubt that they usually make their debut during childhood and stay with us as adults, consciously or not.

Negative thoughts and emotions have a huge influence on our health and well-being, and obviously our weight, both in terms of regulating stress, metabolism and inflammation, but also lifestyle choices and habits. This is why I am convinced that any lasting weight loss is very unlikely to come from outside sources, it needs to come from within. Once you start to understand more about your thoughts and emotions, you can shed the weight in a very natural way, because, in a sense, your body will no longer have its fat storage programs activated (set-point theory) as a result of psychological and emotional distress.

Obviously it could take a while to go through such an internal cleaning process, but I also believe that it does not have to take years or decades, it’s really up to you how hard you work at it. And you should certainly get qualified support if you need it.

But if you skip working on your internal issues and instead go for what you perceive to be the easy way out, i.e. trying a solution from outside sources such as a diet, you are not likely to be successful long-term since those fat storage programs will still be activated, and the weight will likely come back on. Or you will need to be super disciplined in terms of what you eat and how much you exercise for the rest of your life. Some people manage this, but not very many (I know I wouldn’t).

get-skinny-on-fad-diets_e

 

In terms of losing weight long-term, I believe it’s about time we stopped fighting against our bodies and instead realized that we need to work with our bodies instead. If you are carrying excess weight, it probably means that your body has activated fat storage programs as a result of your internal distress (fat is basically a survival mechanism, and your body is reacting quite naturally to stress). Your best bet in deactivating those programs will be to find out why they are activated to begin with, and then gradually turn them off by releasing those internal distress factors.

Erik Hemmingsson

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Polarity abounds and why it’s time for a new way of doing things

It appears to be a human condition to react very slowly, if at all, to adverse changes that happen very gradually (think the obesity epidemic). If bad things happen very quickly, then we have no problem mobilizing at all, such as what happened during the SARS outbreak just over a decade ago. Moreover, the factors that are feeding the obesity epidemic, such as processed junk food, stress, and socioeconomic adversity, have changed steadily but very gradually as well, making for one gigantic slippery slope that we have apparent problems reacting to.

It seems as if many things in society, including the drivers of the obesity epidemic, are now reaching some kind of peak polarity, i.e. you are either very poor or very rich, you either eat only nutritious organic food or only junk food, and you either exercise 7 times per week according to the latest hype, or you refuse to exercise at all. In terms of socioeconomics the middle class is disappearing fast, and the 1% seemingly flourishes at the expense of the rest of society.

Polarities abound in the present time, and this makes it very difficult to make any inroads into creating the conditions we need in order to produce successful obesity prevention and treatment programs. In short, it is very difficult to separate the fortunes of the individual from the rest of society, and society is not in a happy place right now.

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2011/02/income-inequality-in-america-chart-graph

change-since-1979-600

 

Politically, there is much current upheaval in the world, possibly with some kind of peak fear with war in the middle east, ebola outbreaks, water shortages, extreme weather, and an economy in tailspin – can it get any worse?

The good news is that more and more people are waking up to the fact that the current systems, i.e. politics, finance, food environment, lifestyles, etc, are obviously in need of major reform. Maybe we are even getting close to some kind of breaking point for the current dysfunctional way of doing things. I thick that we are, and when enough people wake up to this reality, that is when we can create the conditions we need for preventing obesity globally.

Do we, for example, want to keep eating junk food when it is abundantly clear that such food is very harmful to our health, do we want to keep the current financial system that only seems to work for the 1%, and do we want politicians that are heavily influenced by corporate interests. Or do we want something better? It’s not as utopian as many people think that it is.

 

Erik Hemmingsson

 

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We need to unite

connecting-to-your-followers

There are many things we need to do in order to banish the obesity epidemic, such as flushing the junk food and sugar industry down the toilet (please watch this trailer for the movie Fed Up), reform the economy so that we can create equal opportunities and prosperity for all as opposed to the current system that creates more wealth for the already wealthy 1% and more debt for the rest of us, reduce stress levels, reduce toxicity in our land, air and sea, and create a social environment where people feel happy, balanced and in harmony. This can obviously take a while, but I am convinced that by standing together and saying enough is enough to the things listed above, we can truly move mountains together.

Conversely, if we remain isolated and uninformed, we are sitting ducks for the mega corporations and others who would like nothing better than to keep the status quo. Many people are understandingly frustrated with the current situation and are expecting and waiting for a top-down solutions to our problems. But I have become less optimistic about the ability of governments and organizations to rectify these problematic situations, which have grown increasingly worse during the last 2-3 decades.

I have become more and more convinced that lasting and genuine change needs to come from the bottom up, from the people, the grassroots, the 99%, i.e. people like you and myself. For example, through this simple blog I have connected with so many people I would never have come into contact with before, demonstrating that it’s so easy to communicate these days. The ultimate aim of my work is to get rid of obesity, quite a grand ambition for sure, but it is certainly possible if enough people believe that it is.

Gandhi-Google-Doodle

In order to accomplish this goal, it is very important that we collaborate more, unite more. This is not exactly something academics are renowned for, myself excepted of course… (Yeah, right!). We have to get rid of our egos (should be fun) and do this together. I just started using a Twitter account to alert you to good things around the web, because there are very clear signs that many people are uniting and changing things together. And please send good things back to me and I will be very happy to pass them along. So let’s stay connected, and together we will achieve lasting change for the better.

Erik Hemmingsson

 

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