‘Tis the dieting season

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It’s January and the weight loss industry is gearing itself up for the most intensive part of their year. Many have gained a little too much perhaps over the holidays and now they are resolved to losing some of it. An improved diet and added exercise can obviously bring many benefits, but if you are really serious about losing weight long-term I have some added suggestions.

First, you should try to understand why you gained the weight to begin with. Unless you understand this you are less likely to keep the weight off long-term. Factors such as stress, negative thoughts and negative emotions usually play a major role in weight gain, it’s not just about overindulgence or a lack of exercise. You need to go a little deeper.

Secondly, keep a diary of your thoughts and emotions, particularly when it comes to situations where you experience negative thoughts and emotions, but also what makes you happy and relaxed. By becoming more aware of what presses your buttons so to speak, you can avoid getting into the same situations again, so that your thoughts and emotions gradually become more positive.

Thirdly, try to have a mindset where you do things, such as weight loss, out of a positive perspective, i.e. as a reward and not as a kind of self-punishment. If you feel like your weight loss regimen is a punishment, it will probably not work very well.

Finally, learn to listen to your body and what is needs, don’t disconnect from it or view it as something dysfunctional. Remember that  there are always reasons your body has stored extra weight. If you can get to the source of the weight gain, the path to lasting weight loss will be much clearer.

Lasting weight loss comes from the inside, not the outside

It’s quite remarkable just how much we continue to search for well-being and happiness from outside sources, such as a new job, new relationship, new car, hairstyle, watch, suit, dress, shoes, and the list goes on. If you take a step back and look at our general way of life, it kind of feels like we are conditioned to run around the treadmill of life constantly in need of outside things and gadgets to make us happy. Of course, we rarely get any lasting fulfillment in getting those new shoes, or whatever we long for, yet we keep doing it over and over again.

Einstein

The same can definitely be said of dieting. The pattern of weight loss and regain will be very familiar to all those who struggle with weight problems. A very large part of why dieting fails is that we don’t get to the bottom of why the weight gain occurred to begin with, and, even though there are different ways of looking at this, my view is that the vast majority of weight gain comes from the inside in the form of negative thoughts and emotions. The origins of those negative thoughts and emotions can be very complex but there is no doubt that they usually make their debut during childhood and stay with us as adults, consciously or not.

Negative thoughts and emotions have a huge influence on our health and well-being, and obviously our weight, both in terms of regulating stress, metabolism and inflammation, but also lifestyle choices and habits. This is why I am convinced that any lasting weight loss is very unlikely to come from outside sources, it needs to come from within. Once you start to understand more about your thoughts and emotions, you can shed the weight in a very natural way, because, in a sense, your body will no longer have its fat storage programs activated (set-point theory) as a result of psychological and emotional distress.

Obviously it could take a while to go through such an internal cleaning process, but I also believe that it does not have to take years or decades, it’s really up to you how hard you work at it. And you should certainly get qualified support if you need it.

But if you skip working on your internal issues and instead go for what you perceive to be the easy way out, i.e. trying a solution from outside sources such as a diet, you are not likely to be successful long-term since those fat storage programs will still be activated, and the weight will likely come back on. Or you will need to be super disciplined in terms of what you eat and how much you exercise for the rest of your life. Some people manage this, but not very many (I know I wouldn’t).

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In terms of losing weight long-term, I believe it’s about time we stopped fighting against our bodies and instead realized that we need to work with our bodies instead. If you are carrying excess weight, it probably means that your body has activated fat storage programs as a result of your internal distress (fat is basically a survival mechanism, and your body is reacting quite naturally to stress). Your best bet in deactivating those programs will be to find out why they are activated to begin with, and then gradually turn them off by releasing those internal distress factors.

Erik Hemmingsson

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Want to lose weight?

yoda_2“Ready, are you?”

Last week, there was a lot of focus on abuse. This is not the easiest thing to read about, but given how clear it has become that childhood abuse is probably our #1 cause of disease, disability and death, this is not a topic we can continue to ignore. We all have a responsibility to help prevent future cases of abuse, and therefore there really is no not-getting-involved-in-that option. I choose to get involved, and try to do something about it, and spreading awareness is one way of being part of the solution, I hope.

I was not particularly surprised that very few from the media were interested in publishing a story about a study showing an increased risk of obesity in those who suffered childhood abuse. All the media want these days is to sell the latest fad diet, one more extreme than the other, and hopelessly ineffective to boot, see a new study in JAMA on this topic. There have been so many studies on the futility of dieting that it is quite simply mind-boggling that the media obsession with dieting continues. As things currently are, the large media corporations are certainly not part of the solution, which is really sad.

If 15 years of research on weight loss and obesity treatment has taught me anything, it is that dieting generally does not work. And, yes, I have the data to back up that statement. Sure, the outcome will depend on the individual, and what caused the weight gain to begin with, so it is not an entirely black or white scenario. If you, for example, are one of those who experienced weight gain as an adult as a result of entertaining too many business clients, then you can probably have some small success with a diet and exercise program, with the caveat that you have to stick to it, or you will regain all the weight you have lost.

Obesity, however, is usually established at a very young age, and this is almost like a different disease compared to adult-onset obesity. Going on a diet for someone with childhood-onset obesity is very unlikely to succeed, although it could happen of course. It depends on how long you can adhere to the diet (whatever than diet is), but there is also a lot more to this particular story. What is of paramount importance for those of you who were overweight already as children is to try and figure out why you gained the weight to begin with, and this is where it gets tricky.

I have recently published a new 6-step model on how weight gain occurs from childhood (Obesity Reviews, 2014, September issue) and it looks like this:

 

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What this model suggests is that we have to go much, much deeper than merely going on a diet (or have bariatric surgery for that matter) in order to reach any lasting success. This means addressing things like your thoughts, i.e. core beliefs (e.g. pessimistic or optimistic), and issues related to self-esteem and self-worth. It also means looking at emotional issues and triggers like fear, frustration, anger, hopelessness, shame and guilt. Finally, you need to understand how and when you feel stressed and worry, as they will both wreak havoc with your emotions. And, as you may be aware of by now, when it comes to how we shape our lives, emotions trumps rational thought every time.

The thing you also need to understand is that all, if not most of these internal factors, are usually established at a very early age as a result of your family environment and upbringing. This does not mean that you can’t do anything about it now as an adult, not at all. There are many things you can do to improve things like self-esteem, core beliefs, negative emotions and stress, but it will take both time and effort on your part. Do it one small step at a time. Awareness is the first step.

And once you start to understand where your negative thoughts, emotions and stress come from (we all have them, it’s a tough planet…), and what triggers them, you will probably not have to enforce a restrictive diet and punishing exercise regime in order to get the results you want. Eating a healthy and balanced diet, as well as exercise, will come much more naturally once you start to feel better about yourself on the inside. Change is certainly possible, but I advice you to skip the dieting, as it only tends to increase frustration when the weight comes back on, and instead look more closely at your thoughts and emotions. This is where the real potential for improving weight loss outcomes truly lies.

 

Erik Hemmingsson

 

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