“In my end is my beginning” TS Elliot

ACE pyramidThe ACE study pyramid.

Today I am saluting what I consider to be absolutely groundbreaking research which modern medicine has been ignoring for far too long. The work I am referring to is the ACE study (Adverse Childhood Experiences). This is a large study from the US that convincingly showed that difficult early-life experiences is arguably our leading cause of death, disease, disability, drug use and smoking.  

Let me be a little specific because this subject really fires me up. The researchers measured things like childhood abuse, violence in the family, drug addiction, mental illness, and criminal behavior in the family. Then they performed an analysis to see how such experiences were associated with a wide range of outcomes, including obesity, but also attempted suicide, numerous diseases, smoking, drug use and alcoholism. 

More than half of the participants reported at least one such adverse exposure, a quarter reported more than two, and six percent more than 4. And these were not people from a deprived area, they were predominantly white, college educated, middle class Americans.

Not surprisingly, there were very clear associations between number of adverse experiences and health outcomes. For example, when comparing those with 4 or more adverse exposures with those who had none, the odds ratio of being a smoker was 2.2 (i.e. an increased risk of 120%), 4.6 for depressed mood, 7.4 for being a alcoholic, 10.3 for injecting drugs, and a truly staggering odds ratio of 12.2 for attempted suicide (it’s very rare to see such high odds ratios in medicine, it’s like smoking and lung cancer). In terms of common medical diagnoses, the odds ratio was 1.6 for obesity, 2.2 for ischemic heart disease, 1.9 for any cancer, 1.6 for diabetes, and 3.9 for chronic bronchitis.  

I hereby challenge anyone to find another exposure that comes even close to these risk estimates for the leading causes of death where there is also a very high proportion of the population that is exposed, i.e. population attributable risk. But because of the stigma, shame and taboo surrounding this difficult topic, there is also a staggering lack of awareness of these facts, and hence very little help avaliable.

This has to change and can change if enough people become involved. Please take the time to watch this 13 minute youtube video by the first author Vincent Fellitti (give him and his coworkers the Nobel Prize, I say) on the truly remarkable ACE study findings. 

I wonder how much longer we can go on ignoring this topic and the fundamental role our childhoods play in determining our future health and well-being. Yet modern medicine would have you take next to meaningless drugs, where we sometimes have to treat hundreds for preventing one single case of myocardial infarction or diabetes, with numerous safety issues attached.

But drugs is where the money is, and medicine has shaped itself to a truly gargantuan business model. In many ways, this is an absurd way to practice medicine, especially given the very toxic role of early-life adversity, and the potentially huge beneficial impact of therapy and other holistic methods to overcome such hurts. 

Erik Hemmingsson

If you liked this post, you will have my thanks if you help to spread awareness even more by re-sending it to family, friends and colleagues.  

 

Reference

Fellitti et al. Relationship between childhood abuse and household dysfunction to many of the leading causes of death in adults: The adverse life experiences (ACE) study. Am J Prev Med 1998;14:245-258.

Guest blog post at Dr Sharma’s Obesity Notes: Emotional distress and weight gain

Today I am a proud guest blogger at Dr Sharma’s Obesity Notes on the topic of psychological and emotional distress in weight gain and obesity development, see http://www.drsharma.ca. I have been subscribing to Dr Sharma’s blog for years, and I strongly recommend you do the same if you are interested in real solutions for obesity. Arya M Sharma is a Professor of Medicine & Chair in Obesity Research and Management at the University of Alberta, and a tireless researcher, clinician, debater and overall supporter for people with obesity.