We have been divided and conquered by Big Food

junk-food-pyramid

Let’s face it: we have been divided and conquered by the food and beverage industry. It’s not pretty. In fact, they have been running circles around us, more or less unopposed on their way to almost gaining 100% control of what we eat and obviously making mega profits along the way. Most people probably never realized there was a match on. Sometime in the future, I am sure we will ask ourselves how we could let them get away with so much, just like we today are asking ourselves how we failed to control Big Tobacco.

http://authoritynutrition.com/big-food-is-much-worse-than-big-tobacco/

Here are some of the things they have been getting away with:

– loading our food with toxins, chemicals, preservatives, pesticides, antibiotics and steroids

– adding sugar, salt and fat to pretty much everything to make it more palatable and cover up any bad tastes

– specifically targeting children in their advertising

– increasingly producing “food” in factories without any natural ingredients or nutrients

– saying they want to be part of the solution, for example by reducing calories, but then doing the complete opposite

All of these changes have been very gradual so that no one would notice. Historically, we have been suckers for these slow changes. As an example of just how toxic our food environment has become, picture yourself time-travelling from the 1950:s, just before the rise of the junk/fast food industry, to today. You would be stunned at the amount of junk food on offer, and the brash and cynical marketing that accompanies it (think toys to children from the latest children’s movie, for example).

Now, thankfully, the tide appears to be turning. More and more people are waking up and not liking what they are being served or how mega food companies operate, and are starting to find more healthy and sustainable food sources or even growing their own. Crucially, consumers are also getting more and more connected and organized in fighting back, particularly in the US. This is where the fighting appears to be at its most fierce, since this is also where the food environment is worst.

We have to be mindful, however, of not falling for more of their classic divide and conquer tactics. One such example is when we as researchers try to link a particular junk food or beverage to a particular health outcome, such as obesity or depression. By just focusing on one adverse health outcome, and endlessly debating this, we are shooting ourselves in the foot and not getting anywhere. What we have to do is to analyze the total cost of junk food, including all known health problems and the negative effects on the environment (which are massive).

I doubt that we can count on politicians to solve this for us, this needs to come from the bottom up, i.e. consumer power. And once enough people get fired up and organized, then we will start to see real change happening, i.e. real food, packed with nutrition and grown in a truly sustainable way, available to everyone.

natural-foods

Chasing a different body weight: what are you trying to compensate for?

Arnold-Schwarzenegger

It seems that whenever we feel that we are lacking something, we usually try very hard to compensate for that lack. The kind of lack that we want to compensate the most is any type of inner lack, for example a lack of self-esteem, self-compassion or feeling inadequate in some way, for example by not conforming to current body shape ideals.

And when we have this much focus on bodies and appearance, it is more or less impossible to feel totally fulfilled in the way we look, because we are constantly bombarded with messages of how the “perfect” body should look, i.e. how you should look. This is all a cynical sham of course. Most if not all of those pictures of slim, toned and tanned bodies we see in advertising have been photoshopped beyond belief.

Companies are very good at making us feel a particular type of lack that their service or product can compensate for, maybe a new car (the old one is not good enough), plastic surgery (your body is not pretty enough) or weight loss (you don’t want to look fat while on the beach this summer), etc. Buying something for ourselves can obviously perk us up a bit but we also know that this effect is very short-lived, a mere rush, unless there is a genuine internal change (which usually takes time and effort).

Since body weight is very much influenced by our internal beliefs, thoughts, feelings and emotions, we can help ourselves improve on those internal factors by understanding more about what we are trying to compensate. For example, if we feel that our current weight is not appropriate, then we have negative thoughts, feelings and emotions about our body that we need to be aware of. Perhaps you were told as a child that you needed to lose weight by a parent, a teacher, a coach, i.e. you were told that there was something wrong with the way you looked. Maybe you then internalized those beliefs, which then started to influence your thoughts, feelings and emotions regarding your appearance and body weight.

Bild 2014-10-27 kl. 08.25 #2

If you are running around from one diet to the next, perhaps it is time to look at those negative beliefs, thoughts, feelings and emotions, to see where they come from, and start practicing greater body acceptance instead to gradually reduce those negative internals factors. You will certainly feel better about yourself, and you will be much less vulnerable in the future to negative outside influences, e.g. advertising that promotes unrealistic body shape ideals.

How can we possibly prevent obesity when there is so much inequality?

Make no mistake about it: wealth inequality is one of the main drivers of health and disease generally. Inequality is strongly associated with outcomes such as obesity, depression, diabetes, cancer, heart disease, arthritis, etc. The list is very long.

Given that inequality is reaching new heights every day it seems, we have to ask ourselves how we can possibly hope to prevent obesity, and other major diseases, in the face of this massive inequality? Please watch this short and very informative video of how skew the distribution of wealth really is.

http://consciouslifenews.com/viral-video-us-wealth-inequality/#

If you have the time, you can also listen to self-confessed plutocrat Nick Hanauer talk about how the pitchforks will come out soon if this situation is not remedied.

Indeed, the situation in the US, the UK and elsewhere is not unlike the pre-revolution situation in France some 225-230 years ago. The good thing is that a financial crisis like we have today can act as a very powerful catalyst for replacing the current dysfunctional economy, that only works for the wealthy few, with something that allows everyone to thrive.

Because obesity mostly affects the poor, it is not surprising that the epidemic is doing so well, since more and more people are crossing the poverty line and the middle class is being squeezed. How would you react if you were below that poverty line, and you were being told to buy more vegetables and exercise more, when you are working 2-3 jobs just to stay alive and put food on the table, and not knowing if you are going to have any job next month or even next week?

If governments were really serious about preventing disease, they should first do their utmost to reduce wealth inequality. Only then will it be realistic to expect our prevention programs to have any kind of positive effect on the obesity epidemic.

Erik Hemmingsson

Bullying and obesity go hand in hand in so many ways

If you have any working experience in an obesity treatment facility you would be very familiar with the many gut-wrenching stories of bullying that the patients have experienced. A routine question to ask the patients is if they have any clue as to why they gained the extra weight to begin with. It’s not unusual to hear that it all started with the bullying, usually from a young age.

bullies_kids

You may think that this is mainly peer-to-peer, but it can definitely be from parents as well. Usually this would be related to something they perceive to be not quite right with the child, perhaps carrying a tiny, tiny amount of extra weight. The child will then be told that there is something wrong with them. Obviously this is not the case, it’s the parent who is wrong for instilling the child with an erroneous negative self-belief (there is something wrong with me).

And how many stories have we not heard about  the completely insensitive bullying athletics coach/PE teacher who thinks that the child is overweight and needs to lose weight ASAP, and who always picks these children last for the teams, et cetera, et cetera.

The message for these bullied children is unbelievably negative: you are not good enough, there is something wrong with you, nobody wants to be with you. It’s not exactly strange that the obese in general have lower self-esteem and confidence than normal weight individuals, both as children and as adults.

Then there is the more classic case of bullying among children, sometimes from pre-school, because of a lack of tolerance and respect for what looks slightly out of the norm, particularly give our completely unrealistic body shape ideals. More and more studies are now confirming all those anecdotes about the toxic effects of bullying:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25157018

Indeed, obese children are much more likely to suffer bullying than normal weight children, which is confirmed by both the children themselves and also the teachers. But this does not mean that the bullying only happens during the childhood years. Studies on obesity bias and discrimination are becoming much more common, for example by Rebecca Puhl and colleagues at Yale. Please take the time to watch some if not all of this excellent talk, for example on how stigmatization has a profoundly negative effect on our physical, social, psychological and emotional health and well-being:

If we are serious about preventing obesity, we cannot emphasize enough the importance of zero tolerance towards bullying, in whatever form it comes in, and regardless of where it comes from. We also need to address all those negative self-beliefs and fears that arise as a result of bullying. This include things like body dissatisfaction because we perceived our body as the reason the bullying started in the first place.

antibullyinglogo3

I also firmly believe that anyone who wants to lose weight long-term needs to overcome their more or less inevitable body dissatisfaction, and connect in a more positive way with their bodies, as opposed to rejecting them and seeing them as the source of shame and discomfort. The more you have of negative thoughts and emotions in relation to your body, the more weight you are likely to trap. It’s not exactly a surprise that more and more studies are now confirming that bullying leads to weight gain, which leads to more bulling, which leads to more weight gain, which leads to more bullying…

Erik Hemmingsson

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Lasting weight loss comes from the inside, not the outside

It’s quite remarkable just how much we continue to search for well-being and happiness from outside sources, such as a new job, new relationship, new car, hairstyle, watch, suit, dress, shoes, and the list goes on. If you take a step back and look at our general way of life, it kind of feels like we are conditioned to run around the treadmill of life constantly in need of outside things and gadgets to make us happy. Of course, we rarely get any lasting fulfillment in getting those new shoes, or whatever we long for, yet we keep doing it over and over again.

Einstein

The same can definitely be said of dieting. The pattern of weight loss and regain will be very familiar to all those who struggle with weight problems. A very large part of why dieting fails is that we don’t get to the bottom of why the weight gain occurred to begin with, and, even though there are different ways of looking at this, my view is that the vast majority of weight gain comes from the inside in the form of negative thoughts and emotions. The origins of those negative thoughts and emotions can be very complex but there is no doubt that they usually make their debut during childhood and stay with us as adults, consciously or not.

Negative thoughts and emotions have a huge influence on our health and well-being, and obviously our weight, both in terms of regulating stress, metabolism and inflammation, but also lifestyle choices and habits. This is why I am convinced that any lasting weight loss is very unlikely to come from outside sources, it needs to come from within. Once you start to understand more about your thoughts and emotions, you can shed the weight in a very natural way, because, in a sense, your body will no longer have its fat storage programs activated (set-point theory) as a result of psychological and emotional distress.

Obviously it could take a while to go through such an internal cleaning process, but I also believe that it does not have to take years or decades, it’s really up to you how hard you work at it. And you should certainly get qualified support if you need it.

But if you skip working on your internal issues and instead go for what you perceive to be the easy way out, i.e. trying a solution from outside sources such as a diet, you are not likely to be successful long-term since those fat storage programs will still be activated, and the weight will likely come back on. Or you will need to be super disciplined in terms of what you eat and how much you exercise for the rest of your life. Some people manage this, but not very many (I know I wouldn’t).

get-skinny-on-fad-diets_e

 

In terms of losing weight long-term, I believe it’s about time we stopped fighting against our bodies and instead realized that we need to work with our bodies instead. If you are carrying excess weight, it probably means that your body has activated fat storage programs as a result of your internal distress (fat is basically a survival mechanism, and your body is reacting quite naturally to stress). Your best bet in deactivating those programs will be to find out why they are activated to begin with, and then gradually turn them off by releasing those internal distress factors.

Erik Hemmingsson

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