Want to lose weight?

yoda_2“Ready, are you?”

Last week, there was a lot of focus on abuse. This is not the easiest thing to read about, but given how clear it has become that childhood abuse is probably our #1 cause of disease, disability and death, this is not a topic we can continue to ignore. We all have a responsibility to help prevent future cases of abuse, and therefore there really is no not-getting-involved-in-that option. I choose to get involved, and try to do something about it, and spreading awareness is one way of being part of the solution, I hope.

I was not particularly surprised that very few from the media were interested in publishing a story about a study showing an increased risk of obesity in those who suffered childhood abuse. All the media want these days is to sell the latest fad diet, one more extreme than the other, and hopelessly ineffective to boot, see a new study in JAMA on this topic. There have been so many studies on the futility of dieting that it is quite simply mind-boggling that the media obsession with dieting continues. As things currently are, the large media corporations are certainly not part of the solution, which is really sad.

If 15 years of research on weight loss and obesity treatment has taught me anything, it is that dieting generally does not work. And, yes, I have the data to back up that statement. Sure, the outcome will depend on the individual, and what caused the weight gain to begin with, so it is not an entirely black or white scenario. If you, for example, are one of those who experienced weight gain as an adult as a result of entertaining too many business clients, then you can probably have some small success with a diet and exercise program, with the caveat that you have to stick to it, or you will regain all the weight you have lost.

Obesity, however, is usually established at a very young age, and this is almost like a different disease compared to adult-onset obesity. Going on a diet for someone with childhood-onset obesity is very unlikely to succeed, although it could happen of course. It depends on how long you can adhere to the diet (whatever than diet is), but there is also a lot more to this particular story. What is of paramount importance for those of you who were overweight already as children is to try and figure out why you gained the weight to begin with, and this is where it gets tricky.

I have recently published a new 6-step model on how weight gain occurs from childhood (Obesity Reviews, 2014, September issue) and it looks like this:

 

obr12197-fig-0001

What this model suggests is that we have to go much, much deeper than merely going on a diet (or have bariatric surgery for that matter) in order to reach any lasting success. This means addressing things like your thoughts, i.e. core beliefs (e.g. pessimistic or optimistic), and issues related to self-esteem and self-worth. It also means looking at emotional issues and triggers like fear, frustration, anger, hopelessness, shame and guilt. Finally, you need to understand how and when you feel stressed and worry, as they will both wreak havoc with your emotions. And, as you may be aware of by now, when it comes to how we shape our lives, emotions trumps rational thought every time.

The thing you also need to understand is that all, if not most of these internal factors, are usually established at a very early age as a result of your family environment and upbringing. This does not mean that you can’t do anything about it now as an adult, not at all. There are many things you can do to improve things like self-esteem, core beliefs, negative emotions and stress, but it will take both time and effort on your part. Do it one small step at a time. Awareness is the first step.

And once you start to understand where your negative thoughts, emotions and stress come from (we all have them, it’s a tough planet…), and what triggers them, you will probably not have to enforce a restrictive diet and punishing exercise regime in order to get the results you want. Eating a healthy and balanced diet, as well as exercise, will come much more naturally once you start to feel better about yourself on the inside. Change is certainly possible, but I advice you to skip the dieting, as it only tends to increase frustration when the weight comes back on, and instead look more closely at your thoughts and emotions. This is where the real potential for improving weight loss outcomes truly lies.

 

Erik Hemmingsson

 

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